Zakopane

  • Zakopane

    "The Capital of the Tatra Mountains" – once, a town with a character, a Mecca for artists, eccentrics, sick people and philistines. Nowadays, a challenge for literary archaeologists who wish to excavate only one hundred year-old traces of a past era, which survived only in books, sketchbooks and the interiors of some houses.

     

    Zakopane

    "The Capital of the Tatra Mountains" – once, a town with a character, a Mecca for artists, eccentrics, sick people and philistines. Nowadays, a challenge for literary archaeologists who wish to excavate only one hundred year-old traces of a past era, which survived only in books, sketchbooks and the interiors of some houses.

  • Joseph Conrad

    Joseph Conrad (1857-1924) lived in Zakopane during his last stay in Poland (August – October 1914), where he sought shelter when the news of the breakout of World War I reached him: "And there we remained amongst the Poles from all parts of Poland, not officially interned, but simply unable to obtain the permission to travel by train, or road. It was a wonderful, poignant two months. This is not the time, and perhaps, not the place, to enlarge upon the tragic character of the situation; a whole people seeing the culmination of its misfortunes in a final catastrophe, unable to trust anyone, to appeal to anyone, to look for help from any quarter […]."

    Joseph Conrad

    Joseph Conrad

    Joseph Conrad (1857-1924) lived in Zakopane during his last stay in Poland (August – October 1914), where he sought shelter when the news of the breakout of World War I reached him: "And there we remained amongst the Poles from all parts of Poland, not officially interned, but simply unable to obtain the permission to travel by train, or road. It was a wonderful, poignant two months. This is not the time, and perhaps, not the place, to enlarge upon the tragic character of the situation; a whole people seeing the culmination of its misfortunes in a final catastrophe, unable to trust anyone, to appeal to anyone, to look for help from any quarter […]."

    Pic. Katarzyna Janota

  • Stanisław Ignacy Witkiewicz

    Stanisław Ignacy Witkiewicz (1885-1939) was born in Warsaw, studied in Krakow and travelled a lot, but he is most often associated with Zakopane, where he arrived with his parents when he was five. He was home-schooled by his father Stanisław and took his high school final examinations in Lwów [Lviv], although he was not enrolled in a school there. He lived by mount Giewont until 1914 and then again throughout the whole interwar period (although there is not even the smallest museum devoted to him there).

    Stanisław Ignacy Witkiewicz

    Stanisław Ignacy Witkiewicz

    Stanisław Ignacy Witkiewicz (1885-1939) was born in Warsaw, studied in Krakow and travelled a lot, but he is most often associated with Zakopane, where he arrived with his parents when he was five. He was home-schooled by his father Stanisław and took his high school final examinations in Lwów [Lviv], although he was not enrolled in a school there. He lived by mount Giewont until 1914 and then again throughout the whole interwar period (although there is not even the smallest museum devoted to him there).

    Pic. Katarzyna Janota

  • Guest houses for writers: "Astoria", "Halama", "Orlik"

    During the communist era, guest houses for writers were special places: they provided men of letters, who were a privileged group, with peace and quiet necessary for them to work, but at the same time stirred up a creative atmosphere. Meetings – not only with friends – played a significant role there.

    Guest houses for writers: "Astoria", "Halama", "Orlik"

    During the communist era, guest houses for writers were special places: they provided men of letters, who were a privileged group, with peace and quiet necessary for them to work, but at the same time stirred up a creative atmosphere. Meetings – not only with friends – played a significant role there.

    Stanisław Lem was a frequent visitor to Zakopane and he actually owed his novel debut to a providential meeting during his stay in "Astoria" [see Stanisław Lem’s trail]. Wisława Szymborska was staying in the very same villa when she learned about her Nobel Prize. The poet also visited “Halama”, but this house went down in history as the place of Julian Tuwim's death. Not far from "Halama", there is yet another elegant guest house of this kind – "Orlik". [ezp].