Trzebinia

  • The railway station in Trzebinia

    On the 24th of June 1885, Henryk Sienkiewicz and his wife were travelling through Trzebinia and Vienna to Reichenhall. On the 14th of November 1888 in the morning Henryk Sienkiewicz’s friends were waiting for him at the railway station in Trzebinia when he was returning home from a hunt in Moravia. In 1908, when he lived nearby in Rudawa, he waited for a train at the station in Trzebinia several times.

    The railway station in Trzebinia

    The railway station in Trzebinia

    On the 24th of June 1885, Henryk Sienkiewicz and his wife were travelling through Trzebinia and Vienna to Reichenhall. On the 14th of November 1888 in the morning Henryk Sienkiewicz’s friends were waiting for him at the railway station in Trzebinia when he was returning home from a hunt in Moravia. In 1908, when he lived nearby in Rudawa, he waited for a train at the station in Trzebinia several times.

    Bibliography: Trzebinia. Zarys dziejów miasta i regionu [Trzebinia. An outline of the history of the city and the region]. Ed. Feliks Kiryk. Krakow 1994, p. 237

    Pic. The railway station in Trzebinia in the interwar period – a postcard from A. Kostka’s collection.

  • Trzebinia Petroleum Refinery

    In the 1920s Leon Kruczkowski worked in the Trzebinia Petroleum Refinery, where he wrote fragments of his novel Kordian and the Boor.

    Trzebinia Petroleum Refinery

    Trzebinia Petroleum Refinery

    In the 1920s Leon Kruczkowski worked in the Trzebinia Petroleum Refinery, where he wrote fragments of his novel Kordian and the Boor.

    Bibliography: Andrzej Dadak: Ludzie związani z historią Trzebini. Mieszkańcy Trzebini związani z historią innych miast [People connected with the history of Trzebinia. Inhabitants of Trzebinia connected with the history of other cities]. [in:] Trzebinia. Plan Miasta [City Plan] (history of the city, service guide). Chrzanów 1992, p. [8].

    Pic. The Petroleum Refinery in Trzebinia at the beginning of the 20th century – a postcard from A. Kostka's collection.

  • Ambroży Grabowski

    Ambroży Grabowski (1782-1868) – Polish historian, bookseller, publisher, an outstanding collector, archaeologist and antiquary, an author of guides to Krakow. The results of his many years of diligent work are numerous works with frequent illustrations.

    Ambroży Grabowski

    Ambroży Grabowski (1782-1868) – Polish historian, bookseller, publisher, an outstanding collector, archaeologist and antiquary, an author of guides to Krakow. The results of his many years of diligent work are numerous works with frequent illustrations, the most important of which are: Historyczny opis miasta Krakowa i jego okolic [A historical description of the City of Krakow and its surroundings] (1822, subsequent issues entitled: Kraków i okolice jego [Krakow and its surroundings] in 1830, 1836, 1844), Starożytności historyczne polskie... [Historical Polish antiquities…] (1845), Ojczyste spominki... dyjaryjusze, relacje, pamiętniki itd... [Native recollections... diaries, reports, memoirs etc.] (1845), Dawne zabytki miasta Krakowa [Old monuments of the City of Krakow] (1850), Starożytnicze wiadomości o Krakowie, zbiór pism i pamiętników... [Ancient news about Krakow, a collection of writings and memoirs...] (1852), Skarbniczka naszej archeologii... [A treasurer of our archaeology...] (Leipzig 1854, with 39 images of Krakow towers and gates), O ikonografii polskiej [On Polish iconography], Listy króla Władysława IV [Letters of King Władysław IV], Krótkie przypowieści dawnych Polaków [Short parables of old Poles].

    Ambroży Grabowski was Kajetan Florkiewicz’s nephew and the owner of Młoszowa (which means he was also a cousin of his son and heir of Juliusz Florkiewicz), so he was a frequent guest of the mansion of the Florkiewicz family in Młoszowa. In Młoszowa Grabowski wrote a part of his work Ancient news on Krakow. It was also here that he wrote articles published later in Przyjaciel Ludu and a seires of Memoirs.

  • Palace & Park Complex in Młoszowa

    On the 5th of August 1840 Ambroży Grabowski characterised Młoszowa as follows: 'A delightful village situated 4.5 miles west of Krakow and one mile and a half away from Krzeszowice in a beautiful mountainous place among forests: it almost closes a chain of wonderful Krakow areas and is almost its last link, because the Polish Sahara begins behind it; it is the sandy desert of Jaworzno and Olkusz, where the eye is annoyed by the unpleasant sight of bare sands, and the traveller's legs that get stuck in them become subject to various obstacles.

    Palace & Park Complex in Młoszowa

    Palace & Park Complex in Młoszowa

    On the 5th of August 1840 Ambroży Grabowski characterised Młoszowa as follows: 'A delightful village situated 4.5 miles west of Krakow and one mile and a half away from Krzeszowice in a beautiful mountainous place among forests: it almost closes a chain of wonderful Krakow areas and is almost its last link, because the Polish Sahara begins behind it; it is the sandy desert of Jaworzno and Olkusz, where the eye is annoyed by the unpleasant sight of bare sands, and the traveller's legs that get stuck in them become subject to various obstacles.

    The Młoszowa village lies between the mountains, in the soil where sand prevails; however, there are also areas of beautiful fertile soil with thick woods bringing enormous benefits, and because almost all wood is produced by a sawmill, there is good demand for everything here – from mid-feathers, sawn timber, cut laths to shingles.

    The manor house lies at the feet of two high parallel hills, from whose summits the eye cast above dark forests sees from a long distance the ruins of the Tęczyna castle, Chrzanów and Trzebinia, Piła, Górka Trzebińska and other urban settlements. Covered by these mountains, the court was placed in a cosy retreat, which was pleasant by nature and the art of which perfectly supported the creation of a garden layout in English style, with planting of many deciduous and coniferous trees that "rock" in thick flowerbeds with the incorporation of bushes forming a wild promenade and, above all, rich plantations of flowers etc. [...]

    In old records we could read that ... this building had decayed in the course of time to such an extent that only its ruins testified to its previous existence. From these rubbles the late Florkiewicz erected an almost new building in 1809, turning it into a place of pleasant stay – something like a villa: combining the pleasant and the useful, he built extensive cowsheds, a granary, solid stables, sheds, a brewery and other utility buildings, and even a greenhouse was erected to accommodate those numerous children of flora, flowers and rare plants for the winter that caress the eye pleasantly and fill in the air with fragrant aromas in the garden in the summer.

    The Młoszowa garden in English taste is also the late Florkiewicz's work. In one of its parts, a wild promenade covering one top side, you will find summerhouses and benches in the shadow of shrubs – a good place to rest. Later you cannot avoid the sight of a magnificent rotunda on pillars, a sophisticated cave made of unshapely stones and a Chinese umbrella enticing the passer-by to sit and think. They are surrounded by arboretums (and flowerbeds) consisting of birches, firs, larches, pinetrees and other forest trees and with occasionally rising wandering trees and shrubs – an Eastern thuja, a broad-leaved catalpa, a Judaea tree (Lilodendron Tulipapea), a robinia, a lilac and a weeping willow live in agreement and harmony with nurslings of our forests and are already regarded as indigenous plants. Since I have not mentioned a fruit or vegetable garden so far, someone might be surprised that such a prudent host forgot all about it. However, he did not; the valley between the hills over the manor house arranged in terraces was laid out for fruit trees and vegetables to satisfy the needs of the house sufficiently.

    When you have already seen the garden and the farm buildings near the manor house that speak well for the owner's industry, you can walk off to the surroundings and contemplate many beautiful sights there. Close to the manor house, going up the bank of a small stream that turns around the mill right next to the house, you will come across a mountain with rugged sides, in which you will immediately see plenty of round-shaped stones, whose once jagged sides are completely worn thin. Placed on one another in disorder, these stones are bound by putty or rather hard brown clay, which binds them so strongly and permanently that even a stronger force cannot divide them. I would say these are the conglomerates that I have not seen in any place of this area. Further, on the side, there is a beautiful little Strzałba birch forest dispersed on sides of the hill range, with a beautiful valley (method) in the middle, which swerves in various directions like a labirynth. Even farther there is a sheep shed called the "Sharp Hill", situated in the middle of the birch forest and arranged properly by the late Mr Florkiewicz .

    Looking at the entire farmstead, it is nice to see order and tidiness everywhere and learn about the outstanding common sense of the late Mr Florkiewicz in all ideas as well as his diligence and vigour in the introduction of various farmstead improvements. He was also a man of rare perseverance, who was not put off by difficulties and diligently overcame obstacles so that every day could bring some improvement in that place. He carefully supervised each small detail of the farmstead. He prepared plans of all farmstead structures, he managed all bricklaying and carpentry work, he kept his eye virtually on everything and remedied any inconveniences; this led to the creation of the beautiful Młoszowa, which can safely be regarded as the most beautiful and best maintained property in the entire Krakow Commonwealth – and it is not only beautiful, but also equally profitable.

    In all fairness, we should also admit that he straightened and repaired roads across his property, planted them with trees and erected bridges on them that exist till today; however, these roads involve high maintenance costs and need improvement now, or else they may return to their previous condition.

     

    Pic. Młoszowa today (photo: Jolanta Piskorz).

  • Kajetan Florkiewicz

    In Wspomnienia Ambrożego Grabowskiego [Memoirs of Ambroży Grabowski] published in 1909 by the Association of Lovers of History and Monuments of Krakow we can find the following characteristics of Kajetan Florkiewicz, the owner of the Młoszowa estate.

    Kajetan Florkiewicz

    Kajetan Florkiewicz

    In Wspomnienia Ambrożego Grabowskiego [Memoirs of Ambroży Grabowski] published in 1909 by the Association of Lovers of History and Monuments of Krakow we can find the following characteristics of Kajetan Florkiewicz, the owner of the Młoszowa estate: On the 14th of May 1839 after two weeks of illness Kajetan Florkiewicz – born in a family of city residents in Kęty, in the former Oświęcim Dukedom in 1769, died. He attended the school of Dominican priests in Przeciszów near Oświęcim and the normal Austrian school in Niepołomice. At a very young age, when he was only in his early teens , he went to Krakow and was admitted to the Law Office of Józef Habowski, who was in charge of the legal affairs of more wealthy houses of the Krakow province; there he prepared for work in this profession and, after his principal's death and after marrying his daugther Julia, continued to run these affairs. At the same time, he leased a beautiful but desolate estate of Młoszów with its appurtenances; as those times were good for rural farmers and agricultural products brought excellent profits, after a few years of the lease he began to acquire inheritances from some landlords of these properties and they, remembering his services in affairs that he proficiently ran for them, made the purchase much easier for him by dividing the payment into instalments. He managed the estate skilfully; as he was active and careful and, as it is said, did not let the grass grow under his feet, so he prospered, became wealthy and slowly cleared his property of debts, so the envious petty gentry could never forgive him that he was doing well, while they had nothing and were deep in debt. He was actually prudent, whereas they easily squandered their property by living an idle life and spending more than their income. Under Austrian rule, when everything could be bought for cash, including noble titles, seeing that noblemen used the titles that ordinary people did not have and, most of all, that noblemen's sons were exempt from carrying a gun (and this applied to the war against Prussia) he made a successful effort to obtain the title of a nobleman in the form of the Ozdoba coat of arms. From the marriage with his first wife he had a few sons who died at a young age. From the marriage with his second wife, Magdalena from the Rychliński family, he lost his older son Stanisław, and only his son Juliusz survived. In spite of having a successful life, he did not escape attacks of evil people, who niggled him mainly during the last years of his life. But such is usually the fate of those who have something they did not have previously; they are often slandered by others, who try to spoil their good name. He was my benefactor as my direct uncle, and even left me a keepsake in his last will. The memory of him will be cherished for a long time by those who knew him closer and could watch the dignity of his character. His body will be buried in his parish church in the Trzebinia village. (XV).

    Bibliography:
    Trzebinia. Zarys dziejów miasta i regionu [Trzebinia. An outline of the history of the city and the region]. Ed. Feliks Kiryk, pp. 193-195.
    Wspomnienia Ambrożego Grabowskiego [Memoirs of Ambroży Grabowski]. T. 2 . Krakow 1909. Author: Grabowski, Ambroży (1782-1868), co-author: Estreicher, Stanisław (1869-1939). publisher: The Association of Lovers of the History and Monuments of Krakow. Location of the original: The National Museum in Krakow. Text: The Malopolska Digital Library, p. 47 [36].
    Stanisław Orłowski, Zespół Pałacowo-Parkowy na tle dziejów Młoszowej [The Palace & Park Complex against the background of the history of Młoszowa].Trzebinia 2003, pp. 24-25.
    mloszowa.pl/dawni-goscie-w-mloszowej (Joanna Brzóska)
    Jerzy Jura, Zespół Pałacowo-Parkowy w Młoszowej [The Palace & Park Complex in Młoszowa] [manuscript in the Małopolska Public Library in Trzebinia].

     

    Pic. Juliusz Ozdoba Florkiewicz, the owner of Młoszowa and the author of local legends.

  • Maciej Józef Brodowicz

    Maciej Józef Brodowicz (1790-1885) – Polish doctor, professor of Jagiellonian University and poet. He became famous as the most outstanding professor of internal diseases of Jagiellonian University after Badurski, but also as an author of funny poems, which he published in the collection Kwiatki polne [Field Flowers] (published in Krakow in the printing house of Jagiellonian University under Mańkowski’s direction in 1871 and the second issue in 1884). M.J. Brodowicz dedicated the following poems to the owner of Młoszowa, who became his friend: To the landlord in Młoszowa, To Mr Juliusz Florkiewicz and A farewell to Młoszowa.

    Maciej Józef Brodowicz

    Maciej Józef Brodowicz

    Maciej Józef Brodowicz (1790-1885) – Polish doctor, professor of Jagiellonian University and poet. He became famous as the most outstanding professor of internal diseases of Jagiellonian University after Badurski, but also as an author of funny poems, which he published in the collection Kwiatki polne [Field Flowers] (published in Krakow in the printing house of Jagiellonian University under Mańkowski’s direction in 1871 and the second issue in 1884). M.J. Brodowicz dedicated the following poems to the owner of Młoszowa, who became his friend: To the landlord in Młoszowa, To Mr Juliusz Florkiewicz and A farewell to Młoszowa.

  • To the landlord in Młoszowa

    He does not know the beautiful areas of the Town once under Piast rule
    Or the spirit of the old Polish Nation
    Who has not become familiar with the delightful and well-managed Młoszowa
    And its Landlord whose heart and mind are equally honest.
    Mr Florkiewicz graces Młoszowa,
    And Młoszowa graces him.
    Thus each side does
    What the coat of arms (Ozdoba) wants.

     

    To the landlord in Młoszowa

    He does not know the beautiful areas of the Town once under Piast rule
    Or the spirit of the old Polish Nation
    Who has not become familiar with the delightful and well-managed Młoszowa
    And its Landlord whose heart and mind are equally honest.
    Mr Florkiewicz graces Młoszowa,
    And Młoszowa graces him.
    Thus each side does
    What the coat of arms (Ozdoba) wants.

  • To Mr Juliusz Florkiewicz

    (in the chapter Postscripts to some persons)

    The title and the wreath promise flowers:
    But I forewarn you, Sir:
    These are false substituted witnesses,
    And it’s only a simple bunch of hay
    Reaped partly in the first time of winter
    On a wild, hard and barren soil:
    But most of the after-grass is from autumn,
    When leaves become yellow or red.
    So with it you can stick maybe a hole in the tower
    Where your collection of books lies;
    Or it can serve storks on the wheel,
    Or sparrows for a nest in a barn;
    And let the shepherd lay this poor
    Dry weeded herb under the cattle.

     

    To Mr Juliusz Florkiewicz

    (in the chapter Postscripts to some persons)

    The title and the wreath promise flowers:
    But I forewarn you, Sir:
    These are false substituted witnesses,
    And it’s only a simple bunch of hay
    Reaped partly in the first time of winter
    On a wild, hard and barren soil:
    But most of the after-grass is from autumn,
    When leaves become yellow or red.
    So with it you can stick maybe a hole in the tower
    Where your collection of books lies;
    Or it can serve storks on the wheel,
    Or sparrows for a nest in a barn;
    And let the shepherd lay this poor
    Dry weeded herb under the cattle.

  • A farewell to Młoszowa (a poem from 1874)

    I say farewell to you, charming land!
    ‘As I doubt my legs will

    Run through winding roads of the steep grove ever again,
    And my old eyes could revel
    In the sight that gets more beautiful
    And opens there with almost every step.
    But the memory for your kind landlord
    Can't be extinguished by the Lethean spring,
    And wherever my soul wanders,
    It will always take a picture of Juliusz along.

     

    A farewell to Młoszowa (a poem from 1874)

    I say farewell to you, charming land!
    ‘As I doubt my legs will

    Run through winding roads of the steep grove ever again,
    And my old eyes could revel
    In the sight that gets more beautiful
    And opens there with almost every step.
    But the memory for your kind landlord
    Can't be extinguished by the Lethean spring,
    And wherever my soul wanders,
    It will always take a picture of Juliusz along.

  • Młoszowa

    In footnotes to his poetry volume, M.J. Brodowicz stated the following definition of Młoszowa: ‘the property of Mr Juliusz Florkiewicz, situated 3 miles away from Krakow, in which, apart from the palace and many other buildings erected thanks to the effort of their genial owner, there is an exquisite park occupying 30 morgens on an elevated hill, surrounded with a wall, with marvellous sights on every side. For several years I visited my good old friend in this charming site every year’.

    Młoszowa

    In footnotes to his poetry volume, M.J. Brodowicz stated the following definition of Młoszowa: ‘the property of Mr Juliusz Florkiewicz, situated 3 miles away from Krakow, in which, apart from the palace and many other buildings erected thanks to the effort of their genial owner, there is an exquisite park occupying 30 morgens on an elevated hill, surrounded with a wall, with marvellous sights on every side. For several years I visited my good old friend in this charming site every year’.

    However, Brodowicz realised that the "charming site” created by Florkiewicz is a mystification in a historical sense, because he wrote humorously:

    Why chase after miracles in a foreign country
    Here’s Młoszowa, please sit down and call
    And soon, after you write your name down in the frembuch,
    You will learn attractive things for eyes and ears.
    Who will not be astonished at the judge’s works,
    He built a castle and created its history.
    Three centuries after death he turned neighbours against each other
    He explained the possible structure of prisons to us.
    When Sigismund II was to return from heaven
    To go hunting here, so it is necessary
    To show the room in which he spent the night
    /a memory will serve as payment/.
    Everything is a souvenir here – the name of the Swedish tower
    Proves that the brave Wulfen is buried here nearby.
    You won't see anyone at the Trumpeter's Tower
    But today’s custom is different – guests are trumpeters.
    And The Peacock’s Foot proves evidently the truth
    That you can’t compare Wawel to Młoszowa.

    Bibliography:
    Stanisław Orłowski, Zespół Pałacowo-Parkowy na tle dziejów Młoszowej [The Palace & Park Complex against the background of the history of Młoszowa].Trzebinia 2003, pp. 113-114.
    Trzebinia. Zarys dziejów miasta i regionu [Trzebinia. An outline of the history of the city and the region]. Ed. Feliks Kiryk. Krakow 1994, pp.288-289.
    Maciej Józef Brodowicz, Kwiatki Polne [Field Flowers]. Krakow – issues: 1871 and 1884.
    mloszowa.pl/dawni-goscie-w-mloszowej (Joanna Brzóska).
    Jerzy Jura, Zespół Pałacowo-Parkowy w Młoszowej [The Palace & Park Complex in Młoszowa] [manuscript in the Małopolska Public Library in Trzebinia].

  • Kazimierz Girtler

    A memoirist, a leaseholder of Krzeszowice and then Katowice, an author of extremely picturesque descriptions of landscapes of villages near Krakow.

    Kazimierz Girtler

    A memoirist, a leaseholder of Krzeszowice and then Katowice, an author of extremely picturesque descriptions of landscapes of villages near Krakow.

    In his Stories Kazimierz Girtler put the following characteristics of Kajetan Florkiewicz, the then owner of Młoszowa: ‘Through a change of lands he took over from them what their fathers had cleared of stones with a bloody effort, and gave strips and distant lands instead of close ones; under the guise of discipline, he imposed such requirements on them that poor semi-farmers borrowed shoes from one another before going to church. He ordered them to work for money for the lease, and only few groszy, 8 or 10, were paid for each walking day. The peasants complained to the Senate, and the designated commission put a curb on him. They also said that the inventory submitted by him in support of the requirements was very suspicious, the duties were heavy, and when he stated that this inventory of duties was really very old, they laughed that it must have been written in Bolesław Chrobry's times.

    This picture is completely different from the one presented by Ambroży Grabowski.

    Bibliography:
    Stanisław Orłowski, Zespół Pałacowo-Parkowy na tle dziejów Młoszowej [The Palace & Park Complex against the background of the history of Młoszowa].Trzebinia 2003, pp. 41-42.
    mloszowa.pl/dawni-goscie-w-mloszowej (Joanna Brzóska)
    Kazimierz Girtler, Opowiadania [Stories]. Krakow 1971, vol. II, p. 14.

  • Juliusz Florkiewicz

    Juliusz Florkiewicz, who took Młoszowa over after his father Kajetan, was the creator of many legends connected with Młoszowa. He published them in print, among others, in the Wieniec magazine (in 1880) under the fictitious name “Wawrzyniec Dudziewicz”. A series of articles presenting a fictitious history of the "castle of the Florkiewicz family, which had been invented by the owner himself, was entitled A short historical description of the Młoszow Castle in the Krakow Land. The aim of these press articles was to prove the ancient pedigree of the Florkiewicz family and their seat in Młoszowa.

    Juliusz Florkiewicz

    Juliusz Florkiewicz

    Juliusz Florkiewicz, who took Młoszowa over after his father Kajetan, was the creator of many legends connected with Młoszowa. He published them in print, among others, in the Wieniec magazine (in 1880) under the fictitious name “Wawrzyniec Dudziewicz”. A series of articles presenting a fictitious history of the "castle of the Florkiewicz family, which had been invented by the owner himself, was entitled A short historical description of the Młoszow Castle in the Krakow Land. The aim of these press articles was to prove the ancient pedigree of the Florkiewicz family and their seat in Młoszowa.

    Bibliography:
    Trzebinia. Zarys dziejów miasta i regionu [Trzebinia. An outline of the history of the city and the region]. Ed. Feliks Kiryk, p. 193.
    Krótki historyczny opis Zamku Młoszowskiego w Ziemi Krakowskiej [A short historical description of the Młoszowa Castle in the Krakow Land]. Wieniec, 1880 (a cycle of articles – a photocopy in the Municipal Public Library in Trzebinia)
    Stanisław Orłowski, Zespół Pałacowo-Parkowy na tle dziejów Młoszowej [The Palace & Park Complex against the background of the history of Młoszowa].Trzebinia 2003, pp. 25 and 110-116.

    Pic. Juliusz Ozdoba Florkiewicz, the owner of Młoszowa and the author of local legends.

  • Wilhelm Dichter

    Contemporary Polish writer of Jewish descent, born in Borysław in 1935. In 1968, after the anti-Semitic witch-hunt being a consequence of March events, he emigrated from Poland to the US (he currently lives near Boston). Author of God's Horse (1996, nominated for the Nike Award and translated into several foreign languages) and The Atheists’ School (1999).

    Wilhelm Dichter

    Wilhelm Dichter

    Contemporary Polish writer of Jewish descent, born in Borysław in 1935. In 1968, after the anti-Semitic witch-hunt being a consequence of March events, he emigrated from Poland to the US (he currently lives near Boston). Author of God's Horse (1996, nominated for the Nike Award and translated into several foreign languages) and The Atheists’ School (1999).

    In 1946, as a 12-year-old boy, Wilhelm Dichter arrived together with his parents in Trzebinia, where his father became the Director of the Petroleum Refinery. At that time, Wilhelm attended the school in Trzebionka. In 2003 he arrived in Trzebinia upon invitation from students of the General Secondary School no. 1 (the article on that event is accessible below). During that meeting, he recollected his years spent in Trzebinia with a touch of tenderness, admitting that he 'recollects Trzebinia with love’. It is worth mentioning that the plot of his autobiographical novel God’s Horse takes place in Trzebinia.

    Bibliography:

    Dziennik Polski 2003, no. 253, dated the 29th of October – Małopolska Zachodnia [Western Małopolska] insert.

  • The Salvatorian College in Trzebinia

    Dzwonek Rekolekcyjny z Trzebini, which appeared on the publishing market in 1928 and was the first recollection periodical in Poland, was created in the Salvatorian College in Trzebinia on the initiative of Father Czesław Małysiak (his beatification is currently under way), who was also the first chief editor of the periodical. Thanks to this periodical and the popularisation activity of the clergyman editor, Trzebinia began to be perceived as the centre of the recollection movement in Poland in the 1930s.

    The Salvatorian College in Trzebinia

    The Salvatorian College in Trzebinia

    Dzwonek Rekolekcyjny z Trzebini, which appeared on the publishing market in 1928 and was the first recollection periodical in Poland, was created in the Salvatorian College in Trzebinia on the initiative of Father Czesław Małysiak (his beatification is currently under way), who was also the first chief editor of the periodical. Thanks to this periodical and the popularisation activity of the clergyman editor, Trzebinia began to be perceived as the centre of the recollection movement in Poland in the 1930s. After a change of its title to Drogowskaz in 1933, the recollection monthly was published until September 1939, when World War II broke out. Complete annual sets of this periodical are kept in the Provincial Library of the Salvatorian Fathers (Krakow, ul. Św. Jacka 16). Incomplete annual sets are kept in the Jagiellonian Library in Krakow. In 1906-1996 the Trzebinia publishing centre of the Salvatorian Fathers published also some other periodicals (Posłaniec Salwatoriański, Salwator and some annual sets of Kalendarz Salwatora and Kalendarzyk Salwatora); however, it was the recollection monthly that played the most important role in the history of the Polish press as the first periodical of this kind in Poland.

    At the same time, because of its original title (Dzwonek Rekolekcyjny z Trzebini), this periodical is connected most strongly with Trzebinia.

    Bibliography:

    Salwatorianie w Polsce 1900-1975 [Salvatorians in Poland 1900-1975]. Collective work edited by ks. A. Kiełbasa SDS. Rome-Krakow 1975
    Jolanta Piskorz, Salwatoriański ośrodek wydawniczy w Trzebini 1906-1996 [The Salvatorian publishing centre in Trzebinia 1906-1996]. A doctoral dissertation written at the Faculty of Philologies of the University of Silesia in Katowice under the direction of Prof. Zbigniew Żmigrodzki – a copy available in the A. Asnyk Public Library in Trzebinia.

    The Salvatorian College in Trzebinia (building from 1905), a church tower in the background – today's view (photo: Jolanta Piskorz, 2012).